What do you love to do

After your life has gotten back to as normal as it can be after one’s brain injury, hobbies and sports may change. It is essential to find a new hobby that you enjoy doing.
Finding your niche will allow life to feel more normal and be better than just living to go through the motions. It will take a few tries to see what you enjoy doing.
The thing that might bring pleasure may not come easy, but that doesn’t matter. If it is fun, and you enjoy it the difficulty can be dealt with.
I have found that I enjoy figure skating and let me tell you, it is not an easy thing. I love being on the ice. Even when I have a rough time learning a new jump or spin, I can step back and take a few laps then I am happy to be on the ice again.
Before figure skating, I was into dancing. The transition to skating from dancing was a simple transition that helped make my struggles in skating easy. It doesn’t have to be that kind of shift. It is all about finding what you enjoy.
I am willing to put the work that is needed to be successful because it is what I love doing it. This may be an activity that you enjoyed doing before the injury, or you may want to try something new.
What kind of stuff have you gotten into after your injury?

Invisible Wounds

Wounds or injuries that someone can see just by looking at you are considered real. They earn the sympathy and respect of others. Invisible wounds are more difficult for others to understand and respect.

I have had people think I am lying about my injury because I can walk and talk. I don’t look like I am hurt or scared, and people are visual, so since I look normal, there is nothing wrong with me. The invisible wound judgment can happen with multiple injuries including mental health, cognitive disabilities, and strokes.

I am not saying people need to treat everyone with a brain injury different or sympathetically, I want understanding from people. Even though people cannot see what is going on, doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. They do not understand what exactly one is going through but not fighting your experience would be nice.

I know it is difficult, and I am not big on getting pity but being able to understand why something may be ‘more difficult than it should be’ would be great. Pity is not a fun thing to get. I have almost yelled at people in hopes to get the point across that they can communicate with me like I am an average human.

Everyone wants to be treated normally; this includes people with invisible wounds and visible wounds. It is important that others see you as human because of that what you are. Visible or invisible wounds, you are still human. Do not be afraid to stand up and tell others what you need and how they need to treat you. Being able to work in a comfortable setting is necessary.

The Word Victim

The word victim can produce negative feeling. It can be tough to accept the word or the fact that you are one.

The word victim and survivor are strange to me. The tough part about my brain injury is that I don’t have a life to compare it to. Yes, I lost a lot when it happened, but I never had it. I lost a lot, but we will never actually know what I missed, only what I got.

I am subject to the world around me. I see the victim as a negative word. It means someone who suffered from an event that was not positive. So yes, the word victim is correct in this situation. I don’t feel like a victim. I am a survivor. Survivor is a more positive word.

Survivor came out of a tragic situation and can move forward with their life. A survivor can make the most of their case after the event that happened to them.

I feel like since I never had a life before the accident I do not see myself as a victim or survivor. I do not feel like a victim. But, I am. I survived a traumatic event that changed the course of my life. I just missed the time before my life changed. I have had to deal with the consequences of the accident, but I am still a survivor.

It is nothing to be ashamed of, being a survivor makes you stronger. Everyone is a survivor of something, and it is important to celebrate it. It will allow you to live life to the fullest.

What do you guys think about the words survivor or victim? Should we change the negative connotations for people associated with it?

Support System

The recovery of a brain injury can be a lonely one. Having a good support system with you is essential. Your support system can have various roles they play. They can be a shoulder to cry on, aid in performing exercises or taking you to appointments. Whatever you need, it is crucial that you at least have someone in your corner.
I got lucky with my support system. My two most prominent supporters are my mom and dad. They were always willing to give me what I needed and supported me in what I wanted to do. They were my shoulder to cry on when life seemed hopeless. They were always my largest cheerleaders. If I wanted to try something they made it happen. There was one time when I was younger where they let me go to physical therapy just because I wanted to stand on one foot.

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