New Year: A time for change

The new year allows the ability to reflect on the past year and decide what you would like to change.

The new year is coming soon. It is customary to make goals for the upcoming year and reflect on what happened this past.


I have talked to many people, and they all agree that 2018 flew by. It was not an easy year either. I urge you to reflect on the year.


I find that reflection allows me to understand what I can do differently in the new year. This allows me to plan what I want to do.


I tend to set goals for the new year based on what I decide I want to do differently. This pushes me forward to start the year off on the right foot.


This year my primary goal is to find more time for myself. My job is so tiring, I need to be able to have some downtime, so I don’t get burnt out.


Time for myself includes writing, working out, reading and vegging out while watching tv. I do not have to do all of these, but I want to do some each day.

New Year: Setting a routine


This means I need to find a routine I can stick to that gives me time after work to do these tasks. I have not officially made that schedule yet. But I think it will involve spending an hour after dinner and before bed to do this.


Setting some goals for yourself is good. It allows reflection which can tell you what you want to change. Life can become overwhelming especially when you have a brain injury. Becoming a bit more organized will aid in this.

The classic saying is ‘New year, new you.’ Try to learn something new or relearn something you used to know before your injury. The new time can allow you to live your best life.

Please read my story about my brain injury by clicking here.

Work: Time Management

A full time job can take a lot out of a person with a brain injury. It is vital to find a good balance that works for you.

I work in health care. It is pretty tiring most of the day, but it is gratifying. I love my job. To finish personal items out of work, I had to figure out how to not become mentally fatigued.

Mental fatigue can be severe to overcome. I have tried to give myself a mental break. I have decided that my commute is my mental break, so I vent about what happened that day, and then I blast some music.

This allows me to come home and not be completely exhausted from work. I give myself a break, and then after dinner, I am ready to fulfill my to-do list.

I make sure that I know exactly what I need to get done that night. It allows me to skip figuring out what needs to be done and just do it.

The end of the night, when I am getting ready to go to sleep, I decide what I need to do the next day. This allows me to wind down but also continue to be productive.

The important thing is to prioritize my list. This makes sure everything is done on time. The larger, more time-consuming stuff is done over many nights or on the weekends.

I need to keep reminding myself that sometimes I need to take a break from work. Especially with a full-time job and brain injury, there are times where I need to come home and just relax.

It is essential to know when your mind needs a break and understand it is okay not to get stuff done for one night.

If you have not done so, please read the story about my brain injury by clicking here.

Time Management in School

School is the first real experience of having a deadline to get stuff done. It is important for people with brain injuries to learn the best way for them to manage their time.

We have all heard the words time management. We know what it means. It means being able to be productive promptly.

This is an important concept when there is a lot on the to-do list and deadlines to meet. The first time we learn about time management is during school.

I don’t remember specifically, but I believe that when I had to start learning how to manage my time was in high school. That is when my readings got more time-consuming, and I had to write more papers.

I believe the big thing I needed to learn with my brain injury was how long it would take me to complete a task. After that, knowing what I needed to get done was more comfortable to plan for.

This allowed me to have an idea each night how long what I needed to get done would take me. This translated into college life as well.

Time Management: Friends

The issue in high school and college was friends. I loved them to death, but they were always able to finish in a faster time than me. This allowed them to go have fun.

There were times when I had to decline because I would not have been able to finish what I needed too quickly.

Sometimes its difficult for them to understand. My friends wanted me to go with them and not ‘be lame’ and do homework.

The thing they didn’t understand was that I wasn’t trying to be lame, I was just trying to do my job. My job was school, and if I felt that it wasn’t finished, I was going to finish it.

It was vital for me to do what I needed to do and stick with it. I had a lot more fun doing stuff with friends when I didn’t have to worry about work.

Some people will never understand the importance of what you need to do, especially if it isn’t a fun choice. It is necessary to stick to what you believe is the correct choice.

If they are good friends, they will understand.

If you want to read about how my brain injury came to be, please click here.