Support System: They are Important and Valued

A support system is everything. They are cheerleaders, shoulder to cry on and warriors when needed. They are there to make life easier.

The recovery of a brain injury can be a lonely one. Having a good support system with you is essential. Your people can have various roles they play. They can be a shoulder to cry on, aid in performing exercises or taking you to appointments. Whatever you need, it is crucial that you at least have someone in your corner.

I got lucky with my support system. My two most prominent supporters are my mom and dad. They were always willing to give me what I needed and supported me in what I wanted to do. They gave me shoulder to cry on when life seemed hopeless and they were always my largest cheerleaders. If I wanted to try something they made it happen. There was one time when I was younger where they let me go to physical therapy just because I wanted to stand on one foot.

Support System: Choice


What I find most amazing about my parents is that they didn’t expect to raise a child like me. They made the choice to be my support system and that they would stick with me and give me the best life I could live. I would not be where I am or who I am today without their support. I guarantee that it was difficult at times, but they were still there when I needed them.

No one ever chooses to have their loved one suffer a brain injury but how they want to react will make all the difference. It is not a comfortable situation to be in. My doctors were preparing my parents for me not to be able to live on my own or walk. I can not imagine what was going through their head. But they never once walked away from me. A support system can make or break your recovery. Surrounding yourself with warm and understanding people is essential. People who will be willing to fight for your best interest even when you can’t.

In case you missed it, here is my story and why I am writing this blog.

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Acceptance: A Path to a Happier Life

Living life in denial is not fun. I believe that in order to get the most out of one’s journey is acceptance. This allows you to live a happier life.

Last week I wrote about blame, so this week is a happier subject; acceptance. I am going to talk about how I have gotten to the point of accepting my situation.My life took a turn after my accepted my situation. It was not an easy road; It is tough to admit that this is your life and yes it could have been different, but it is not.

I go through waves where it is easier to keep accepting my injury. There are where I would rather know what I could be doing if I never got a brain injury. I am sure everyone who has gone through a life-altering experience deals with this. It is nice to know I am not alone but there are times where it doesn’t matter. A couple of days where you need to pout is okay but to accept the life that has been thrown at you. You must make the most of life.

Acceptance

I learned early on that getting to where I wanted to be and what I wanted was not impossible, it just took a lot of work. Accepting this took time and does not come all at once. Even the ability to recognize that I had to work harder in everything I wanted to do was a start towards acceptance. After a brain injury it is all about small steps. If one can celebrate those steps, the more considerable feat will seem less daunting. The ability to observe the more modest achievements help keep motivation up.
You can do what you want to put your mind to. It will just take some time. Be patient. Accept when you need to ask for help and appreciate the small victories.

Missed my story about why I started this blog. Please click here.

Blame: Where Should it be Placed?

When difficult events happen in life that make daily living tough, it is easy to find someone to blame.

Blame is an interesting word. When you blame someone, you are holding them accountable for whatever they did or what you think they did. It is easy to criticize someone for something that is not ideal. It is difficult not to place blame when you’re in a frustrating situation. In my case, there was someone to point blame to too quickly, but there are some instances where it requires more creativity, and the easy out does not always make sense.

There are times where I blame the brain injury in general. It makes life easier when it gets frustrating. For me, the real blame is the hospital. Every time I couldn’t do something I wanted to, I would fault the people who “did this to me.” I grew up blaming the hospital, this made the stuff I couldn’t do, their fault. The blame got worse the harder a task was, and the more I tried. Because of attacking others I felt better about myself.
I am sure everyone has felt this way, even ones without a brain injury. The brain injury is just another venue to use for the blame. It is an excellent way to explain why you can’t do something or why it takes you longer to complete a task. It is not fair to play the blame game, but it makes life more comfortable and more bearable.

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Welcome to Living with a Brain Injury

Hello, my name is Samantha. I have had a brain injury since I was born. I don’t know life without it. That is different from others experience. Most people with brain injuries remember what life was like before. I am stuck questioning what could my life had looked like if specific events didn’t occur. It is difficult to walk around life asking what ifs.

Everyone has them. What if this didn’t happen, what could I be doing now? The unknown is difficult to ponder, and there are a lot of factors. For everyone with a brain injury it is difficult to live and accept your brain injury, but as a kid, it is especially tricky. As a kid, all that is important is fitting in and making friends. When you must leave class to get individual help or cannot hang out after school because you need to go to various therapy sessions, friends become curious. To explain what is going on, don’t you have to understand it yourself?

The Differences of having a brain injury

What your routine is, isn’t what routine is for anyone else. My goal for this blog is to let kids know that being different isn’t the worst thing and as you grow up, it gets better. I am here to talk about my experience with my brain injury and the roller coaster of emotions that went along with it. It is possible to push past the obstacles that life throws at you. My experience has taught that everything happens for a reason, even if the goal isn’t apparent at the moment.

I graduated college a year ago and still have no idea what I am going to do with my life. There is even a reason for me not having a plan for my life right now. I know that my ultimate goal in my life is to help kids dealing with the long process of learning to live with a brain injury.